writer, cartoonist, stand-up comic, web developer. boston. i care about important things
micdotcom:

7 devastating realities facing Black domestic violence victims in America 

2. For many women, domestic abuse leads to death.
This is notably true for black women, who comprised 8% of the U.S. population but 22% of intimate partner homicide victims and 29% of all female victims of intimate partner homicide in 2005.
Needless to say, these figures are remarkably disproportionate. Janay Palmer is not alone in her circumstances.
Domestic violence is chronically underreported | Follow micdotcom
micdotcom:

7 devastating realities facing Black domestic violence victims in America 

2. For many women, domestic abuse leads to death.
This is notably true for black women, who comprised 8% of the U.S. population but 22% of intimate partner homicide victims and 29% of all female victims of intimate partner homicide in 2005.
Needless to say, these figures are remarkably disproportionate. Janay Palmer is not alone in her circumstances.
Domestic violence is chronically underreported | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

7 devastating realities facing Black domestic violence victims in America 

2. For many women, domestic abuse leads to death.

This is notably true for black women, who comprised 8% of the U.S. population but 22% of intimate partner homicide victims and 29% of all female victims of intimate partner homicide in 2005.

Needless to say, these figures are remarkably disproportionate. Janay Palmer is not alone in her circumstances.

Domestic violence is chronically underreported | Follow micdotcom

gbcnt:

Terry Crews on Ray Rice.

hypem:

Tracy Chapman - Fast Car

Such a goddess her crunchy voice, the songwriting, everything.

- BANKS

always chills

liefplus:

wow generic quote image i found that is rly encouraging to me
liefplus:

wow generic quote image i found that is rly encouraging to me

liefplus:

wow generic quote image i found that is rly encouraging to me

Beating Writer’s Block

writingbox:

Everyone has their own ways of beating writer’s block, and different things work for different people. Here’s a few suggestions to try:

  • Re-read what you’ve written, highlight your favourite parts to rediscover your excitement for the story.
  • Edit the opening paragraph.
  • Cut the opening paragraph.
  • Do ten minutes of free writing.
  • Write a blog post about how to beat writer’s block.
  • Do some housework.
  • Go for a walk.
  • Read a book.
  • Do some exercise.
  • Have a cup of coffee and some cake.
  • Listen to music.
  • Write your main character’s journal.
  • Write something totally different.
  • Write your book’s blurb.
  • Edit a photo of yourself to look like a zombie.
  • People watch.
  • Wash your hair.
  • Buy yourself a new notebook.
  • Write something to throw away.
  • Write the stupidest story you can think of.
  • Write poetry.
  • Write a song.
  • Draw a picture.
  • Make something creative.
  • Upcycle an old piece of clothing/furniture.
  • Tie yourself to your desk and just push on through it.
  • Allow yourself to suck.
  • Write character outlines.
  • Flesh out your plotting notes.
  • Write the ending.

Anyone else got other suggestions that work for them?

  • Speak descriptive passages into your phone or computer
  • Write dialogue unattached to any character / look at old dialogue you wrote and see if you can write a scene out of any of it
  • See how fast you can fill an empty journal page, see if you can do it in a minute
  • Do drawings about characters in your stories, revise the story to include details of the drawing
  • Outline a story or novel, start collecting these outlines
  • Do a character profile of someone you remember from the last week, write bits of how they’d talk, things they believe in
  • Load something old into Hemingway and start rewriting it
  • Take a character you’ve already written about and write another story about him / her
  • Go to the bar with just a notebook and drink two beers (or waters)
  • Write a found poem based on any scraps of paper or ads you see
  • Realize anything you write is just the first of three or four versions of that thing, so don’t worry about making it perfect. Just make it readable. If you haven’t yet realized this, wait until you realize it

Do the other things on the list but don’t languish too long. Writing is fickle, tenuous. If you let go of it even a little bit it won’t want you anymore.

My struggle with writing has always been this…fear of writing scenes I didn’t know how to write. Or if I didn’t know what was going to happen in the scene exactly. I would write around the edges, afraid to write the scary build-ups, or the climaxes, or the clifflhangers. I always figured I’d get around to them eventually. But eventually often means never.

Sometimes now when I feel like I can’t write or I’m just waiting for inspiration I’ll pick on purpose one of those scenes I didn’t know how to write and just…start writing it. First in a notebook, then in a word processor, and (for the project I’m working on now) then as storyboard sketches, then as comic panels, and then I revise the writing again and let the thing sit. It’s almost as though the process provides its own excitement; it’s just up to me at that point to make sure there’s something for me to write / rewrite / sketch / ink / revise / finalize (/code / publish).

So, more things:

  • Scribbling in a pad of paper for a few minutes every few days.
  • Challenging yourself to go headlong into something you’ve been avoiding.
  • Giving yourself a process to bolster and facilitate your creativity. 

I think a lot of it also boils down to this: if you can’t write, find some other way to write.

lisahanawalt:

Tuca layin’ eggs!
Oh hey the Tuca links were down for awhile but I fixed ‘em. Read all the old Tuca comics right HERE.
lisahanawalt:

Tuca layin’ eggs!
Oh hey the Tuca links were down for awhile but I fixed ‘em. Read all the old Tuca comics right HERE.

lisahanawalt:

Tuca layin’ eggs!

Oh hey the Tuca links were down for awhile but I fixed ‘em. Read all the old Tuca comics right HERE.

if we’re out at a bar and i come back from the bathroom and i don’t know you but you’re trying to defend your point of view that we should nuke iraq to my girlfriend and her friends, hi, hello, you don’t know me but i’m about to make you feel very unwelcome
so i come back and my girlfriend mouths to me “he’s saying we should nuke iraq” so i sit next to the guy. white guy, buzz cut, black rimmed glasses. i can hear he’s talking about isis, so i butt into the convo
"oh hey, you’re talking about isis, right?"
"yeah"
"then don’t you mean nuke syria?"
"nuke ‘em both" dude turns it up to 11 immediately.
if you say this seriously, as a conversational tidbit and not a form of obvious trolling, just know that to a small percentage of the people you’ll be saying it to will no longer think of you as a human being, but as a monster
"why are nukes in the equation? you shouldn’t want to nuke anyone."
the guy reconsiders who he might be talking to. he decides i’m probably some young, idealistic, poli-sci major
"i guess i just don’t care. i’m apathetic, you know?"
"lots of people really do care though. i really care. don’t say that nuke shit around me or my friends"
"are you still in college or something?" this is the first time he tries to other me, challenging my authority based on age
"no, i’m 27. but let me say, you’re operating from the pinnacle of privilege right now, you’re a straight white male who thinks that people who are out of sight and vaguely dangerous they should be obliterated, and that these are defensible views”
"well, yeah, but you’re white and male. i don’t know if you’re straight, but…" second attempt at othering. challenging my authority based on sexual orientation.
"uh huh. well i’m using my privilege to shut you down for saying stupid shit and you’re using it to talk about nuking innocent people in other countries"
"i guess i shouldn’t have talked politics. can’t a guy just come out with his friends for a drink and have fun?" translation: "i just came out  to have a good time and honestly i’m feeling so attacked right now."
"not if you’re promoting the blanket killings of large groups of people you’ll never have to see getting disintegrated, no."
"are you a jew?" third attempt at othering. (whoa! i’m actually all of the same things he is, but i don’t agree we should nukes should ever be on the table)
"no, are you jewish?"
"no."
"then what does that have to do with anything? and why are you asking me like that, instead of asking if i’m jewish?"
"because you’re starting to annoy me, so i thought you might be a jew"

yuppp

in short, from this interaction i learned that sometimes white supremacy and privilege serve as a platform of apathy from which to hand down insensitive prescriptions of violence against other groups of people, not to be questioned

later, the butthurt holden caulfied flagellated on the outskirts of our group, and i overheard him express to a friend that maybe they should go somewhere else, because “i don’t feel very popular here”

image

kelsium:

I dunno, man, sometimes I stop and think about how much media and news I consume is all violence against women all the time and how much of what I think about is violence and how much of pop culture is covert violence against women and, like, no wonder I’m exhausted all the time.

feimineach:

If you’ve been keeping up with any (feminist/ social justice) internet lately, you’ll have heard of Anita Sarkeesian’s continued online harassment from gamers who disagree (or don’t want to hear) that gaming communities are inherently misogynistic and that the games themselves are, often, sexist. On the links below, Sarkeesian tackles some of that sexism by exploring the issue of women as (nothing more than) background decoration, sex objects, and victims of male violence, in video games.

Women as Background Decoration (Part 1) (video above):

In this episode we explore the Women as Background Decoration trope which is the subset of largely insignificant non-playable female characters whose sexuality or victimhood is exploited as a way to infuse edgy, gritty or racy flavoring into game worlds. These sexually objectified female bodies are designed to function as environmental texture while titillating presumed straight male players. Sometimes they’re created to be glorified furniture but they are frequently programmed as minimally interactive sex objects to be used and abused.

Women as Background Decoration (Part 2):

This is the second episode exploring the Women as Background Decoration trope in video games. In this installment we expand our discussion to examine how sexualized female bodies often occupy a dual role as both sexual playthings and the perpetual victims of male violence.

Video:

this stuff is required watching

is it awesome that boys grow up playing games that are made in an ecosystem that sees women as sexual objects, props, power-ups? based on what i’ve seen out of male behavior re: these videos, i’m gonna say no. the games industry works continually to engage and encourage a presumed male audience (though women make up the majority of players) to actively participate (and continue participating) in collective fantasies of control and power over women

girls who play these games see a disproportionate amount of women who are prostitutes (and why are so many of them offering free sex? is this what game makers are providing in place of a rewarding romantic storyline with an actual woman?) and seemingly no other examples of female portrayal beyond the occasional old lady

why can’t we write better games? why aren’t women more often protagonists, or friends of protagonists, or at the very least non-sexual npcs? what if violence against women was more often prohibited or disincentivized?

all this work to make games look amazing, and still perpetuate the same objectification and dumbing-down of women…

we can do better than this, guys

gradientlair:

samueldelany:

Toni Morrison and Junot Díaz, speaking on race, gender, and literature. Also, their talk is ASL-signed.

This talk is great! I watched it a few months ago and wrote about it as well.